This is where you'll find all the free video-lessons and free TAB/Notation. If you want the PDF-file for the video-lesson, just click on the title of the lesson, (just above the video) and you'll get the PDF. Hope you'll like this, and please let me know about other things that you'd like me to add to the page! /Emil


This is a jazz-blues that I wrote, called the "Mini Maton Blues" or "Blues for Georg" and the melody is very inspired by Charlie Parker. To listen to the song, go on YouTube and search for "Mini Maton Blues" or "Emil plays his mini maton", and you'll find it. Click below (Blues For Georg - (PDF))to get the free PDF with TAB/Notation.


Lick 1 - This is probably the most famous lick in the world. It’s a very simple bluegrass-style lick, and I use it here to demostrate how you can take it to another level, using open strings.


Lick 2 - This lick is a “bluegrassy” lick from the intro to one of my tunes. Start slowly and work it up to speed.


Lick 3 - I find these kinds of licks very useful. It can be tricky to play at first, but once you learn the pattern for the right hand, it’s fairly easy. Good luck with lick of the week number three!


Lick 4 - This is a 2 5 1-lick in C Major. It’s very very simple, but I think it’s important to learn licks like this. Notice the first note played over each chord is the third of the chord, and it’s good to practice to land on the third.


Lick 5 - One of my favourite songwriters for the guitar is Jerry Reed. This is a classic lick of his, in E. Reed had a lot of ideas like this one, when two lines are played simultainously, creating harmony.


Lick 6 - This is a great “Chord Lick” using the same shape the whole lick through. The top note is just a simple blues lick,
and it sounds interesting when you harmonize it like this. 


Lick 7 - Hope you enjoy this fun open string idea in A minor. Look closely on the guitar fingering for the right hand!


Lick 8 - This is a jazzy turnaround lick in the key of F. I’ve listened a lot to George Benson lately, and Im so inspired! What an amazing player.


Lick 9 - I really enjoy listening to a lot of different styles of music, and different kinds of guitarplayers. The more country players, blues players or jazz players I listen to, the more I hear how they all have influences in different styles of music. For example; this lick is stolen from Johnny Hiland, a great country rock player. I heard it in a country blues, but this lick can work perfect in a Bebop Jazz tune or a Jazz-blues too. Try this lick in different styles of music! I bet you can make it work in a classical piece too! ; )


Lick 10 - This is an outro lick that I heard Tommy Emmanuel play at the end of his great arrangement of “Lady Madonna”. It’s kind of a quick country lick that reminds me of Albert Lee. Have Fun!


Lick 11 - This is an altered lick that I heard Georg Wadenius play on a christmas tune!


Lick 12 - To harmonize scales is a good thing, because you find all the arpeggios that you can use when you improvise. In this example I’ve taken an Eb arpeggio from the Bb melodic minor scale, and I use it over a A7 chord, wich gives us some nice altered notes. Experiment with it!


Lick 13 - Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed were experts at coming up with licks that had two lines played simultaneously, creating harmony. This lick works great at the end of a blues tune. Have fun!


Lick 14 - One of the most unique Jazz players I’ve ever heard is Jimmy Wyble. Check this lick out!


Lick 15 - Here is a open string run in A minor that I picked up from Doyle Dykes.


Lick 16 - I used this lick in my arrangement of “White Christmas”! I hope you’ll like it!


Lick 17 - I gave one of my guitar students a lesson on right hand technique, and a few of the exercices that we did, involved a lot of open string scales and ideas. One of the things I asked him to do for the next lesson, was to take a scale that he knew, and play it in a totally different position on the neck, using open strings. This is a good exercise, because it makes you think, and you have to be creative. It also helps you to understand the neck of the guitar better, and who knows, you might come up with something cool, like this!


Lick 18 - This is a typical “Emil-Lick” that I use all the time. It’s played over a Dmaj7 chord, and I use two different arpeggios; F#m7 and Dmaj7. The right hand technique is pretty tricky, and it takes some time to get it to sound even, but once you get the technique down, you can use it with many other arpeggios and come up with new nice ideas. Have Fun!


Lick 19 - Chicken pickin’ from Brent Mason!


Lick 20 - Here is a little turnaround-lick and lesson on using diminished arpeggios over dominant 7th chords.


Lick 21 - Here is a great open string run in D. It reminds me of Chet and Jerry! Have fun!


Lick 22 - This is almost just a C major scale played using open strings, starting on the open A note. I heard Chet Atkins play this lick on the tune “Cascade”, written by Gene Slone. The album is “Guitar Legend: The RCA Years” (disc 2). Great right hand workout! Enjoy!


Lick 23 - Here’s a fun “two-line” idea in A. Enjoy!


Lick 24 - This lick is a good example of how you can use triads from the major scale when you are soloing. It’s just a II V I lick in G, that I heard from Charlie Byrd.


Lick 25 - Another II V I lick. This one’s in C, and I wanted to show you how you can use the E major triad over the V chord, to get some nice altered notes. The E triad sounds like a G13b9 played over the V chord.


Lick 21 - Here is a great open string run in D. It reminds me of Chet and Jerry! Have fun!


Lick 22 - This is almost just a C major scale played using open strings, starting on the open A note. I heard Chet Atkins play this lick on the tune “Cascade”, written by Gene Slone. The album is “Guitar Legend: The RCA Years” (disc 2). Great right hand workout! Enjoy!


Lick 23 - Here’s a fun “two-line” idea in A. Enjoy!


Lick 24 - This lick is a good example of how you can use triads from the major scale when you are soloing. It’s just a II V I lick in G, that I heard from Charlie Byrd.


Lick 25 - Another II V I lick. This one’s in C, and I wanted to show you how you can use the E major triad over the V chord, to get some nice altered notes. The E triad sounds like a G13b9 played over the V chord.